January 2017 Annual Meeting Edition

January 2017 Annual Meeting Edition

Volume 3, Issue 2

This issue features expanded coverage of the 2016 ASH Annual Meeting, as well as a focus on CAR T-cell therapy, and more.

Table of Contents

January 2017 Annual Meeting Issue

The Family That Puzzles Together …

Sunday, January 15th, 2017
In December’s issue, Associate Editor David Steensma, MD, shared his lifelong love of word games, and how he went from fighting over the newspaper...

January 2017 Annual Meeting Issue

ASH Recognizes Choosing Wisely® Champions, NIH Awards Grant to Examine Spliceosomal Mutations in MDS,...

Sunday, January 15th, 2017
ASH Recognizes Choosing Wisely® Champions During Annual Meeting The American Society of Hematology (ASH) recognized three inaugural Choosing Wisely® Champions during the 2016 annual meeting....

ASH Medical Educators Institute, New ASH On Demand Webinars, and more

Sunday, January 15th, 2017
ASH Emphasizes the Importance of Medical Education Careers With ASH MEI The American Society of Hematology (ASH) Medical Educators Institute (MEI) is designed to develop...

January 2017 Annual Meeting Issue

Cartwheels for CAR T-Cell Therapy?

Sunday, January 15th, 2017
Chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T-cell therapy is a revolutionary approach to targeted immunotherapy to treat cancer, and the details can seem like the stuff...

January 2017 Annual Meeting Issue

Enoxaparin Does Not Prevent Placenta-Mediated Complications in Pregnant Women With Severe Preeclampsia

Sunday, January 15th, 2017
Pregnant women who have severe preeclampsia (a disease characterized by impaired vascular response to placentation) before 34 weeks of pregnancy are at an increased...

Randomized Trial Finds Rivaroxaban a Safer Option Than Warfarin for Patients With Atrial Fibrillation...

Sunday, January 15th, 2017
The “triple-therapy” anticoagulation regimen (consisting of a vitamin K antagonist plus dual antiplatelet therapy with a P2Y12 inhibitor and aspirin) has been...

Uncovering the Natural History of Primary Ocular Adnexal MALT Lymphoma

Sunday, January 15th, 2017
Primary ocular adnexal MALT lymphoma (POAML) is the most common orbital tumor affecting patients in the United States, but little is known about the...

Characterizing Ph-Like Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia: A High-Risk Subgroup With Few Treatment Options

Sunday, January 15th, 2017
Treatment outcomes of patients with B-cell acute lymphocytic leukemia (B-ALL) vary according to age, with adult patients experiencing a poorer prognosis than pediatric patients....

CMS Experimenting With New Accountable Care Organization Model, FDA Updates, and more

Sunday, January 15th, 2017
CMS Experimenting With New Accountable Care Organization Model The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) announced the Medicare−Medicaid Accountable Care Organization (ACO) Model, which...

January 2017 Annual Meeting Issue

Balancing Bleeding and Thrombosis Risk With Anticoagulation in Patients With Hematologic Malignancies and Thrombocytopenia

Sunday, January 15th, 2017
Two studies presented at the 2016 ASH Annual Meeting examined the safety of anticoagulation therapy in patients with hematologic malignancies – a population with...

Results from Phase III SWOG Trial: 7+3 Still the Standard of Care for Patients...

Sunday, January 15th, 2017
Remission induction with 7+3 chemotherapy (cytarabine + daunorubicin) should remain the standard of care for younger patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML), according to...

Subcutaneous Delivery of Daratumumab Is Safe, Effective in Multiple Myeloma

Sunday, January 15th, 2017
While daratumumab was approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) as an intravenous (IV) infusion for the treatment of multiple myeloma (MM),...

Large Registry Analysis Confirms Autologous Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation Is Feasible in Older Patients

Sunday, January 15th, 2017
Older patients (≥65 years) with hematologic malignancies are often considered unsuitable for autologous hematopoietic cell transplantation (AHCT) because of the potential for higher risks...
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